HULL, Wis. — Investigators in central Wisconsin have given new attention to the 2006 death of a pharmacist found in his home with two gunshot wounds to his chest.

Two detectives have been newly assigned to 58-year-old Ken Juedes’ fatal shooting, the Marshfield News-Herald (http://mnhne.ws/2cbVahz ) reported.

A Marathon County detective will spend about 30 hours a week devoted to solving the case, and another detective will investigate the case part time.

Marathon County Detective Greg Bean has been involved with investigating the death since Juedes’ widow, Cindy Schulz-Juedes, found him in their home in the town of Hull on Aug. 30, 2006. He said investigators have recently updated their plan of action in a new bid to close the case.

Bean said investigators are hoping for a statement or piece of evidence that will help solve the case.

Juedes’ brother, Donald Juedes Allen, said his family receives updates from investigators about every two months.

“They have done a Herculean job (investigating this case),” Allen said. “They have spent hours and hours on this case, and they have several boxes of files. The problem is much of the evidence is circumstantial.”

Bean said investigators haven’t talked to Schulz-Juedes in several years, and that she has never asked investigators for an update.

Schulz-Juedes said Monday that she was aware it was the 10-year anniversary of her husband’s death, but that she wasn’t interested in commenting further.

“I don’t feel I am a person of interest in my husband’s death,” Schulz-Juedes said to the Wausau Daily Herald in 2013. “Most of the money went to the kids. Moneywise, my husband and I together would have earned more in two years than I ever would have gotten from his death, and I still would have had my husband.”

Allen said he hopes Marathon County assistant district attorney Theresa Wetzsteonwill be willing to prosecute the case. Wetzsteonwill is running unopposed for district attorney this fall and is expected to be sworn in Jan. 3.


Information from: News-Herald Media, http://www.marshfieldnewsherald.com

VIAThe Associated Press
SHARE
The AP is one of the largest and most trusted sources of independent newsgathering. AP is neither privately owned nor government-funded; instead, as a not-for-profit news cooperative owned by its American newspaper and broadcast members, it can maintain its single-minded focus on newsgathering and its commitment to the highest standards of objective, accurate journalism.