SACRAMENTO, Calif. — The Latest on action on climate change legislation in the California Legislature (all times local):

11:25 p.m.

California’s Legislature is approving regulations on cow flatulence and manure, which are blamed for releasing greenhouse gases.

The measure was approved shortly before the end of the legislative session Wednesday after its author, Democratic Sen. Ricardo Lara of Bell Gardens, agreed to give dairy farms more time to comply.

SB1383 seeks to reduce methane emissions associated with manure to 40 percent below their 2013 levels by 2030. Methane is one of several gases known as short-lived climate pollutants that don’t persist for long in the atmosphere but have an outsized influence on the climate.

The bill also calls for efforts to significantly increase composting to eliminate the amount of food waste in landfills, which releases methane when it breaks down.

Republicans say the rules will harm businesses.


6:10 p.m.

The California Legislature has approved a $900 million spending plan for environmental programs as lawmakers near the end of the two-year legislative session.

The Senate and Assembly approved AB1613 on Wednesday. It’s the product of negotiations between Gov. Jerry Brown, Assembly Speaker Anthony Rendon of Paramount and Senate President Pro Tem Kevin de Leon of Los Angeles, all Democrats.

They agreed to spend two-thirds of the $1.4 billion in funds available from California’s cap on carbon pollution on a variety of efforts to promote cleaner air and reduce carbon emissions.

It includes funding for clean vehicle incentives, urban plants and efforts to create cleaner air in disadvantaged communities.

Democrats say it will make communities healthier, while Republicans say the money comes from a program that harms businesses.


5:20 p.m.

A $900 million spending plan for environment-related programs has cleared the California Senate.

The Senate approved AB1613 in a 25-13 vote Wednesday, hours after Gov. Jerry Brown and Democratic legislative leaders agreed to spend nearly two-thirds of the available money generated by the state’s cap on carbon pollution.

The measure still must clear the Assembly.

Democratic Senate President Kevin de Leon of Los Angeles says spending the money would make communities healthier and help blunt the harmful effects of climate change.

Republican Sen. Jeff Stone of Temecula says the money would go to Democratic pet projects and would be better spent on preventing wildfires. He voted against it Wednesday.


12:50 p.m.

Gov. Jerry Brown and California’s top legislative leaders have reached an agreement to spend nearly two-thirds of the available money generated by the state’s cap on carbon pollution.

Brown announced the $900 million deal in the final hours of the legislative session Wednesday.

It includes money for clean vehicle incentives, urban plants and efforts to create cleaner air in disadvantaged communities.

The agreement is the product of negotiations between Brown, Senate President Pro Tem Kevin de Leon of Los Angeles and Assembly Speaker Anthony Rendon of Paramount. All three are Democrats.

It could end two years of indecision over what to do with $1.4 billion in revenues from California’s fee on polluters, known as cap-and-trade. About 60 percent of program revenues are earmarked for specific projects including high-speed rail.