NEW YORK — The latest on developments in global financial markets (all times local):

4:00 a.m.

September got off to a quiet start on Wall Street as stocks ended narrowly mixed after a day of wavering between gains and losses.

Utilities and financial stocks ended lower Thursday, but technology and materials companies managed modest gains.

Among individual stocks, Campbell Soup sank 6 percent after reporting results that fell short of analysts’ forecasts. Hewlett Packard Enterprises rose 3 percent.

The Dow Jones industrial average edged up 18 points, or 0.1 percent, to 18,419.

The Standard & Poor’s 500 index fell a fraction to 2,170. The Nasdaq composite rose 14 points, or 0.3 percent, to 5,227.

More stocks fell than rose on the New York Stock Exchange.

Bond prices rose. The yield on the 10-year Treasury note fell to 1.57 percent.


11:45 a.m.

The stock market is getting September off to a weak start as indexes turn lower in midday trading.

Campbell Soup sank 6 percent Thursday after reporting results that fell short of analysts’ forecasts. Costco also fell 3 percent after its sales disappointed.

Energy companies fell in tandem with the price of oil. Exxon Mobil and Chevron each fell 1 percent.

The Dow Jones industrial average gave up 86 points, or 0.5 percent, to 18,315.

The Standard & Poor’s 500 index fell 10 points, or 0.5 percent, to 2,160. The Nasdaq composite declined 10 points, or 0.2 percent, to 5,202.

Bond prices rose. The yield on the 10-year Treasury note fell to 1.56 percent.


9:35 a.m.

The stock market is starting off September with slight gains, led by retailers and other consumer stocks.

Wynn Resorts jumped 6 percent, the most in the Standard & Poor’s 500 index. Cruise operator Royal Caribbean rose 3 percent.

Campbell Soup sank 5 percent after reporting results that fell short of analysts’ forecasts.

The Dow Jones industrial average rose 28 points, or 0.2 percent, to 18,429.

The Standard & Poor’s 500 index added 2 points, or 0.1 percent, to 2,173. The Nasdaq composite gained 13 points, or 0.3 percent, to 5,227.

Bond prices fell. The yield on the 10-year Treasury note rose to 1.61 percent.