NEW ORLEANS — The Latest on indictment involving thousands of tons of potentially explosive artillery propellant (all times local):

Noon

A contractor says it has destroyed 31 percent of the potentially explosive artillery propellant abandoned at Camp Minden in Louisiana.

Statistics from Explosive Service International show that just under 5 million pounds of the M6 propellant has been burned. Vice president Jason Poe says they’re updated automatically every 15 to 30 minutes.

The Environmental Protection Agency formally approved the Baton Rouge company’s system to burn the chemical in mid-June.

About 7,800 tons of M6 was left at Camp Minden after a company called Explo Systems went bankrupt in 2013.

On Thursday, a federal judge unsealed an indictment against Explo Systems’ owners, who live in Kentucky and Tennessee, and four officials, all from Louisiana.

They’re accused of lying to get contracts to “demilitarize” the M6 artillery propellant, storing it unsafely and obstructing inspections.


11 a.m.

Arraignment is scheduled Sept. 19 for owners and officials of a company charged with conspiracy involving 7,800 tons of potentially explosive artillery propellant eventually abandoned at a Louisiana facility.

They’re accused of lying to get contracts to “demilitarize” the M6 artillery propellant, storing it unsafely and obstructing inspections.

Attorneys Ron Miciotto (mish-OH-toh) and Donald Hathaway Jr. say their clients are innocent. Miciotto represents owner David Fincher of Burns, Tennessee, and Hathaway represents vice president of operations William Terry Wright of Bossier City, Louisiana.

Explo Systems’ other owner, David Alan Smith, is from Winchester, Kentucky. All four officials are from northwest Louisiana.

All six are charged with criminal conspiracy. The owners, Wright and two other officials each face six counts of wire fraud and more than 20 of making false statements.