NEW YORK — Adult readers in the U.S. still strongly favor paper over e-books, according to a new study from the Pew Research Center.

Around 65 percent of those surveyed had read a paperback or hardcover over the past year, compared to 28 percent who had read an e-book, Pew reported Thursday. Around 40 percent only read print books, while just 6 percent favor e-books exclusively. Fourteen percent said they had listened to an audio book, up two percentage points from 2015, but the same as in 2014.

E-book sales surged after Amazon.com introduced its Kindle reader in 2007. But they began leveling off a few years ago and have even declined for some major publishers. Those who do read e-books prefer a tablet computer (15 percent) or cellphone (13 percent) rather than a dedicated device such as the Kindle (8 percent).

Overall, 73 percent of Americans 18 and older read a book over the past year, up one percentage point from 2015 but below the 79 percent recorded for 2011. Women were more likely to have read a book (77 percent) than men (68 percent).

The Pew report is based on a nationwide telephone survey of 1,520 American adults, conducted March 7-April 4.

VIAThe Associated Press
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