PAWNEE, Okla. — The Latest on the large earthquake in Oklahoma (all times local):

6 p.m.

Oklahoma Gov. Mary Fallin has declared a state of emergency in Pawnee County after a magnitude 5.6 earthquake struck northwest of Pawnee.

The earthquake struck at 7:02 a.m. Saturday and was felt throughout the Midwestern United States, although no severe damage or serious injuries were reported.

The quake ties a 2011 earthquake for the strongest earthquake in recorded state history.

Fallin’s order allows state agencies to make emergency purchases for disaster relief and is the first step toward asking for federal assistance, if necessary.

Fallin said in a statement that information is still being gathered and will be reviewed by her coordinating council on seismic activity.

The state of emergency lasts for 30 days and additional counties may be added.


5 p.m.

The Oklahoma Corporation Commission is requiring the shutdown of 37 wastewater disposal wells in the area around the epicenter of a magnitude 5.6 earthquake.

The mandate from the commission’s Oil and Gas Division comes after the Saturday morning earthquake near Pawnee and includes 514 square miles under commission jurisdiction. Commission spokesman Matt Skinner says another 211 square miles in Osage County is under the jurisdiction of the Environmental Protection Agency.

He says the commission is working with the EPA, which will decide what action to take there.

Skinner says it isn’t known how many wells in Osage County might be affected.

The wells will be shut down within 10 days according to a schedule that Skinner says is necessary because seismologists have warned that a large and sudden shutdown of the wells could cause another earthquake.

Skinner says the wells were directed to shut down due to scientific links that the increase to the underground disposal of wastewater from oil and gas production induces earthquakes. The commission has previously asked producers to reduce wastewater disposal volumes.


2 p.m.

The 5.6 magnitude earthquake that struck north-central Oklahoma apparently did not cause significant damage partly because of the type of rock beneath the region.

Geophysicist Jefferson Chang with the Oklahoma Geological Survey said a hard, or competent, bedrock crosses north-central Oklahoma while the subsurface around Prague is softer. Chang said the harder rock absorbs more of an earthquake’s energy, reducing potential damage.

Emergency officials say the Saturday morning quake northwest of Pawnee led to sandstone facings of some buildings falling, but that no buildings collapsed.

The quake is the same magnitude and approximately the same depth as a 2011 earthquake near Prague, about 60 miles to the south. In that quake, two towers collapsed at a university in nearby Shawnee.


1:20 p.m.

Officials at a nuclear power plant in the southeast corner of Nebraska say tremors from the Oklahoma earthquake were felt at the plant.

Nebraska Public Power District’s Cooper Nuclear Station south of Brownville declared an “unusual event” just after 7 a.m. because of the minor tremors.

Officials say there was no damage to the plant or equipment, and no threat to the public or plant personnel occurred. The plant continued operating Saturday, but station personnel increased monitoring of plant equipment, per the plant’s policy.

Station emergency preparedness manager Jim Stough says the nuclear station was built to withstand some earthquakes and other scenarios that are likely to occur in the region.

Officials say local, county, state, and federal agencies were notified of the event.


12:25 p.m.

The Oklahoma Corporation Commission has directed dozens of wastewater disposal wells within an approximate 500-square-mile radius of the epicenter the Oklahoma earthquake to shut down.

The commission says about 35 wells are included in the directive, which was issued following the 5.6 magnitude earthquake that struck Saturday morning about nine miles northwest of Pawnee in north-central Oklahoma.

The number of magnitude 3.0 or greater earthquakes has skyrocketed in Oklahoma, from a few dozen in 2012 to more than 900 last year.

Commission spokesman Matt Skinner says the wells were directed to shut down due to scientific links that the increase to the underground disposal of wastewater from oil and gas production induces earthquakes. The commission has previously asked producers to reduce wastewater disposal volumes.

The earthquake ties the record for the strongest earthquake in recorded Oklahoma history. No major damage was reported, and there was one minor injury.


11:45 a.m.

One minor injury has been reported as the result of a 5.6 magnitude earthquake in north-central Oklahoma.

Pawnee County Emergency Management Director Mark Randell says a man protecting his child suffered a head injury when part of a fireplace fell on him.

Randell says the man was treated at a hospital and released.

The U.S. Geological Survey reports the quake struck at 7:02 a.m. about nine miles northwest of Pawnee, a town of about 2,200 about 70 miles northeast of Oklahoma City.

The USGS also reports about a half-dozen aftershocks in the same area, including one that was a 3.6 magnitude at 7:58 a.m.


This update has been corrected to show that the area where the earthquake hit is northeast of Oklahoma City, not northwest.


11 a.m.

Staffers at the Wolf Creek nuclear power plant in southeast Kansas found no damage to the plant after an earthquake rattled a large swath of the Midwest.

Spokeswoman Jenny Hageman says Saturday’s 5.6 magnitude earthquake centered in north-central Oklahoma did not shake the plant near Burlington, Kansas, enough to set off a seismic alarm but staff checked it as a precaution.

KVOE reports (http://bit.ly/2bKgNRo ) the plant was shut down Friday by a water leak. Hageman says the source of the leak in the reactor cooling system inside the plant’s containment area has been identified and that there was never of threat of a radiation leak.

It’s unclear when Wolf Creek will return to operation.


10 a.m.

A Pawnee business owner says the 5.6 magnitude earthquake shook his house “like a rubber band” and knocked items off cabinets and broke glass.

Furniture store owner Lee Wills told The Associated Press he was awake when the quake struck at 7:02 a.m. Saturday and first thought it was a thunderstorm.

But then his home, which is about 2½ miles outside of town, started shaking.

Wills said buildings in the downtown area are cracked and sandstone facing on some buildings fell and described the scene as “a mess.”

The quake was felt as far away as Nebraska.


9:10 a.m.

The Pawnee County emergency management director says no injuries have been reported and no buildings have collapsed following a magnitude 5.6 earthquake that ties a 2011 temblor for the strongest in Oklahoma history.

Mark Randell said the Saturday morning quake did cause cracks and damages to city buildings, some of which date to the early 1900s.

The U.S. Geological Survey reports the quake struck at 7:02 a.m. about nine miles northwest of Pawnee, a town of about 2,200 about 70 miles northeast of Oklahoma City.

The U.S.G.S. also reports a 3.6 magnitude aftershock in the same area at 7:58 a.m.


This update has been corrected to show that the area where the earthquake hit is northeast of Oklahoma City, not northwest.


8:55 a.m.

Oklahoma Gov. Mary Fallin says that crews are checking bridges and structures for damage after the 5.6 magnitude earthquake, which ties a 2011 temblor for the biggest on record in the state.

Fallin tweeted Saturday morning that the Oklahoma Department of Transportation is checking bridges in the Pawnee area for damage. The quake was centered about 9 miles northwest of the town of about 2,200 people.

Fallin also tweeted that state officials want structural engineers to look at building safety in the wake of the quake, which the U.S. Geological Society happened at 7:02 a.m.

No major damage was immediately reported. The quake was felt as far away as Nebraska.


7:20 a.m.

An earthquake has rattled a swath of the Great Plains, from Kansas City, Missouri, to central Oklahoma.

The United States Geological Survey didn’t immediately post data on its website about the size of the earthquake or where it was centered.

People in Kansas City, Missouri, Fayetteville, Arkansas, and Norman, Oklahoma, all reported feeling the earthquake at about 7:05 a.m. Saturday.