COTTAGEVILLE, S.C. — The Latest on Tropical Storm Hermine’s path along the East coast (all times local):

6:30 p.m.

New York City officials have extended beach closures beyond Labor Day because of continued deadly rip currents caused by storm system Hermine.

Parks officials say beaches will be closed to swimming, bathing and surfing on Tuesday.

The New York Post reports police issued $80 tickets to at least four surfers at the famed summertime Rockaway Beach surf spot.

An emergency worker who dived into the Atlantic Ocean at Coney Island to save a swimmer who violated the ban tells the newspaper the current felt like a “300-pound guy” pulling him back out to sea.”

At least three deaths associated with Hermine have been reported as the storm moves along the East Coast.


2 p.m.

A third death associated with Tropical Storm Hermine has been reported as the storm moves along the East Coast.

Authorities say 30-year-old Michael Woodrum was trying to remove a tree that fell on U.S. Highway 17-A near Cottageville, South Carolina, on Friday when he was struck by a car. Officials say Woodrum died at a hospital on Saturday.

High winds tipped over an 18-wheeler on Saturday, killing its driver and shutting down the U.S. 64 bridge in North Carolina’s Outer Banks.

Earlier in Florida, a homeless man was killed by a falling tree.

Hermine rose over the Gulf of Mexico and hit Florida on Friday as a Category 1 hurricane before weakening to a tropical storm as it moved across Georgia.


3:15 a.m.

Hermine (her-MEEN) will continue to twist hundreds of miles off shore in the Atlantic Ocean and keep swimmers and surfers out of beach waters because of its dangerous waves and rip currents on the last day of the long holiday weekend.

Dennis Feltgen of the National Hurricane Center said Sunday “We’re not looking at a landfall,” adding Hermine is just sitting and pushing the water up along the coast making storm surge a great concern.

It’s expected to stall over the water before weakening again.

Hermine rose up over the Gulf of Mexico and hit Florida on Friday as a Category 1 hurricane before weakening to a tropical storm as it moved across Georgia.