LOS ANGELES — The Latest on California’s landmark climate change law (all times local):

11:45 a.m.

California will further slash greenhouse gas emissions after Gov. Jerry Brown extended the nation’s most ambitious climate change law by another 10 years.

The Democrat signed the legislation Thursday at a park in Los Angeles amid opposition from the oil industry, business groups and Republicans.

Lawmakers last month approved a 10-year extension of the state’s landmark climate change law. It set a new goal to cut emissions 40 percent below 1990 levels by 2030.

California is on track to meet the current target set a decade ago to reduce emissions to 1990 levels by 2020.

Brown also signed a bill that would provide greater oversight of the appointed Air Resources Board, which is in charge of climate policy.


11:25 p.m.

California Gov. Jerry Brown is set to extend the nation’s most ambitious climate change law by another 10 years, charting a new goal to reduce carbon pollution.

Brown chose an urban natural park on the edge of downtown Los Angeles as his setting to sign the legislation into law on Thursday.

The legislation is a priority for Brown. It expands on California’s landmark 2006 law, which set the goal of reducing greenhouse-gas emissions to 1990 levels by 2020.

The new measure sets a new goal of reducing emissions 40 percent below 1990 levels by 2030.

The Democratic governor calls that the most aggressive target enacted by any government in North America.

Brown is also set to sign another piece of legislation that provides more oversight of the appointed Air Resources Board, which implements the law.