BEIRUT — The Latest on Syria’s civil war (all times local):

11:30 p.m.

Lebanon’s militant Hezbollah group, which is taking part in Syria’s civil war, says it supports the cease-fire but vows to continue fighting against the Islamic State group and al-Qaida’s affiliate.

Hezbollah’s media arm known as the Military Media says the “allies of Syria” abide by whatever the Syrian government decides. The Military Media said late Saturday that the truce is an opportunity that everyone should take for the interest of the Syrian people.

The group vowed to repel any attack its members are subjected to during the truce.

Hezbollah has sent thousands of fighters to Syria to back President Bashar Assad’s forces.

The announcement came after the Syrian government said it supports the U.S.-Russia agreement adding that it will cease its military operations in Aleppo.


10:45 p.m.

Syrian opposition activists say intense airstrikes on rebel-held parts of the northern city of Aleppo and nearby villages and towns have killed at least 45 people.

The Aleppo Media Center, an activist collective, said 45 people were killed Saturday, just hours after a new U.S.-Russian agreement was reached to try and end the violence in Syria. The Britain-based Syrian Observatory for Human Rights said 69 people were killed in Aleppo province, including 13 children and teenagers.

Contrasting casualty figures are common in the aftermath of large attacks in Syria.

The United States and Russia announced a deal Saturday that would establish a nationwide cease-fire starting on Monday, followed a week later by an new military partnership targeting Islamic State and al-Qaida militants as well as the establishment of new limits on the forces of Syrian President Bashar Assad forces.


8 p.m.

Syria’s state news agency SANA says the Syrian government accepts the new U.S.-Russian cease-fire agreement.

The Saturday report says that hostilities will stop in the northern city of Aleppo, the country’s largest, for “humanitarian reasons.” It adds that the U.S.-Russia agreement “was reached with the knowledge and approval of the Syrian government.”


3 p.m.

Turkey is hailing a new U.S.-Russian agreement aimed at halting the fighting in Syria and delivering humanitarian aid.

Turkey’s Foreign Ministry said in a statement Saturday that it was pleased with the deal, which is to take effect on Monday, coinciding with the Muslim Eid al-Adha holiday.

The ministry says Turkey will deliver aid through the United Nations to the Syrian city of Aleppo, which has seen heavy fighting in recent months. It says the agreement is “critical” for ending the fighting throughout Syria, and specifically Aleppo.

Turkey is a leading backer of the rebels fighting to overthrow President Bashar Assad. It launched a military incursion into Syria last month to battle the Islamic State group and halt the advance of U.S.-backed Kurdish forces, which it views with suspicion.


12:45 p.m.

The main Syrian opposition umbrella group says it hopes a new U.S.-Russian agreement will be enforced in order to ease the suffering of civilians.

Basma Kodmani, of the High Negotiations Committee, tells The Associated Press that Russia should pressure President Bashar Assad’s government to abide by the agreement reached early Saturday.

The United States and Russia announced a deal that foresees a nationwide cease-fire starting on Monday, followed a week later by an unexpected new military partnership targeting Islamic State and al-Qaida militants as well as the establishment of new limits on Assad’s forces.

Kodmani says mechanisms will be needed for the enforcement of the deal, including the “cessation of hostilities and the grounding (of) regime air forces.”