CONCORD, N.H. — The Latest on New Hampshire’s primary election (all times local):

11:35 p.m.

Two top races remain too close to call in New Hampshire’s primaries late Tuesday night.

In the governor’s race, the Republican contest remained a tight battle between Executive Councilor Chris Sununu and state Rep. Frank Edelblut. Manchester Mayor Ted Gatsas, who was expected to place in the top two, and state Sen. Jeanie Forrester conceded defeat earlier in the evening.

In the 1st Congressional District, it was a close race between Republican U.S. Rep. Frank Guinta and his primary challenger, Rich Ashooh. Guinta has struggled since last year, when the Federal Election Commission said he took illegal campaign donations from his parents.


10:25 p.m.

Former state Rep. Jim Lawrence will challenge Democratic U.S. Rep. Annie Kuster after winning his party’s primary in New Hampshire’s 2nd Congressional District.

Lawrence defeated state Rep. Jack Flanagan and five others in Tuesday’s GOP primary. Kuster, who has represented the district for two terms, was unopposed on the Democratic side.

Lawrence, who lives in Hudson, is a U.S. Air Force veteran who now runs construction consulting firm. He campaigned on a theme of cutting waste in Washington, reducing bureaucracy and returning power to the people.

This was Lawrence’s second run for Congress. He finished third in the 2014 primary.


10 p.m.

Manchester Mayor Ted Gatsas is conceding in the Republican primary for governor.

Executive Councilor Chris Sununu and state Rep. Frank Edelblut are locked in a close battle for the nomination. State Sen. Jeanie Forrester is also in the race.

Gatsas says he will support the winner and is happy to get back to running the city of Manchester. He is in his fourth term of mayor.

“We’ve got to be as tough in a loss as we are in the victories,” he told his supporters at a Manchester gathering.


9:30 p.m.

Democrat Colin Van Ostern is pledging to focus on “good jobs, good schools and good access to health care” as he accepts his party’s nomination for governor.

Van Ostern, 37, has defeated rivals Mark Connolly and Steve Marchand to represent his party in the race to replace outgoing Democratic Gov. Maggie Hassan.

Speaking to supporters in Manchester, he’s pledging to focus on ending the state’s drug crisis, funding full-day kindergarten across the state and protecting state dollars for Planned Parenthood.

Van Ostern is serving his second term on the Executive Council, a five-member body with approval over state contracts and gubernatorial nominations. He’s also worked in the private sector at Stonyfield Yogurt and Southern New Hampshire University.

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8:30 p.m.

Colin Van Ostern is the winner of New Hampshire’s Democratic primary for governor.

Van Ostern is a two-term Executive Councilor from Concord. He’s defeated Mark Connolly and Steve Marchand as his party’s nominee to replace outgoing Democratic Gov. Maggie Hassan.

In the primary, Van Ostern focused on his work at Stonyfield Yogurt and Southern New Hampshire University’s College for America program. He previously worked as a Democratic political operative.

Van Ostern, 37, has aligned himself closely with Hassan and touted his support for Medicaid expansion and state funding for Planned Parenthood. The Executive Council is a five-member body that approves gubernatorial nominations and large, state contracts.

A winner has not yet been declared in the Republican gubernatorial primary.


8 p.m.

Republican U.S. Sen. Kelly Ayotte has comfortably defeated primary challenger Jim Rubens.

She’s now officially facing Democratic Gov. Maggie Hassan in one of the country’s most closely watched U.S. Senate contests. Polls continue to show the race in a dead heat and roughly $100 million in outside spending is expected to pour into the state.

Rubens also ran unsuccessfully in the 2014 Republican primary against Scott Brown.

Ayotte has angered some more conservative members of the Republican base over several of her more moderate positions, such as her support for the Clean Power Plan. But Rubens failed to capture a large following.


7:30 p.m.

Polls have started closing in New Hampshire and all will be closed by 8 p.m.

Candidates’ supporters are beginning to gather at primary night parties across the state.

Gubernatorial candidates Colin Van Ostern, Mark Connolly, Ted Gatsas and Frank Edelblut are hosting events in Manchester. Steve Marchand and Chris Sununu are in Portsmouth and Jeanie Forrester will be in her hometown of Meredith.

Towns where polls closed at 7 are beginning to report results.


1:50 p.m.

Republican gubernatorial rivals Chris Sununu and Frank Edelblut have crossed paths at a Bedford polling place.

The two briefly chatted and shook hands Tuesday outside Bedford High School. They’re in a four-way primary with Manchester Mayor Ted Gatsas and state Sen. Jeanie Forrester.

Both Sununu and Edelblut say they’ve encountered some still-undecided voters as they visit the polls.

Sununu’s closing pitch is that he has the experience and business know-how to be an effective governor. He promises to get Washington out of New Hampshire.

Edelblut, meanwhile, says he’s the only true outsider as a first-term state representative.


Noon

Republican U.S. Sen. Kelly Ayotte is hitting two popular Manchester restaurants to campaign as voters head to the polls for the primary.

Ayotte is facing a challenge from former state senator Jim Rubens. But she’s receiving a warm reception at Blake’s diner, with most diners saying they’ve already voted for her, or plan to. The Puritan Backroom was next.

Ayotte says she’s taking “nothing for granted” and will be “crossing her fingers” as the results come in Tuesday. She would face Democratic Gov. Maggie Hassan in the general election.

She also says her position hasn’t changed on GOP congressman Frank Guinta, who represents Manchester and is in a primary of his own. She called for him to resign last year after the Federal Election Commission found he accepted campaign donations in excess of the legal limit. Guinta said he contributed to a family pot of money but returned the money as ordered in January.


10 a.m.

Candidates are getting off to an early start as New Hampshire voters choose their nominees for governor, U.S. Senate and the U.S. House of Representatives.

In the U.S. Senate race, Republican Jim Rubens and his wife, Susan, cast their ballots at 7 a.m. Tuesday at the Hanover High School Gymnasium before heading out to greet voters in Bedford. Rubens is challenging U.S. Sen. Kelly Ayotte for the party’s nomination.

Democratic gubernatorial candidate Mark Connolly voted in New Castle at 9 a.m. before making the rounds in Portsmouth. Colin Van Ostern showed up with his wife and children to vote in Concord. Steve Marchand also is vying for the nomination to replace outgoing Democratic Gov. Maggie Hassan, who’s running for the U.S. Senate. Ted Gatsas, Frank Edelblut, Chris Sununu and Jeanie Forrester are running for the Republican gubernatorial nomination.

Republicans in the 1st and 2nd Congressional Districts also are facing off.


9:20 a.m.

Candidates are getting off to an early start as New Hampshire voters choose their nominees for governor, U.S. Senate and the U.S. House of Representatives.

In the U.S. Senate race, Republican Jim Rubens and his wife, Susan, cast their ballots at 7 a.m. Tuesday at the Hanover High School Gymnasium before heading out to greet voters in Bedford. Rubens is challenging U.S. Sen. Kelly Ayotte for the party’s nomination.

Democratic gubernatorial candidate Mark Connolly voted in New Castle at 9 a.m. before making the rounds in Portsmouth. Steve Marchand and Colin Van Ostern also are vying for the nomination to replace outgoing Democratic Gov. Maggie Hassan, who is running for the U.S. Senate. Ted Gatsas, Frank Edelblut, Chris Sununu and Jeanie Forrester are running for the Republican gubernatorial nomination.

Republicans in the 1st and 2nd Congressional Districts also are facing off.


7:15 a.m.

New Hampshire voters are heading to the polls to choose nominees for governor, U.S. Senate and the U.S. House of Representatives.

Three Democrats and four Republicans are competing to replace outgoing Democratic Gov. Maggie Hassan, who is challenging Republican U.S. Sen. Kelly Ayotte. Ayotte is facing a primary challenge from Republican Jim Rubens, but appears poised to be her party’s nominee.

Republican Congressman Frank Guinta, still facing criticism over campaign donations from his parents in his 2010 race, faces a competitive primary from businessman Rich Ashooh in the 1st Congressional District. It encompasses the eastern part of the state as well as the city of Manchester.

Republicans Jack Flanagan and Jim Lawrence are facing off in the 2nd Congressional District, which covers Concord, Nashua and all of western New Hampshire.