NEW YORK — The latest on developments in global financial markets (all times local):

4:00 p.m.

U.S. stocks finished an up-and-down day slightly lower as traders look ahead to this week’s meeting of the Federal Reserve.

Phone companies and health care stocks posted losses Monday, but banks ended modestly higher as traders hoped that higher interest rates would help them make more money from lending.

Verizon ended 1 percent lower, and WebMD slumped 6 percent after the company said its CEO is leaving.

The Dow Jones industrial average ended down 3 points, less than 0.1 percent, at 18,120. It was up as much as 131 points earlier.

The Standard & Poor’s 500 index was little changed at 2,139. The Nasdaq slipped 9 points, or 0.2 percent, to 5,235.

Bond prices fell. The yield on the 10-year Treasury note rose to 1.71 percent.


11:45 a.m.

U.S. stocks are rising in midday trading, led by gains in banks and industrial companies.

Banks made some of the biggest gains Monday as investors wait for the Federal Reserve to meet this week. Several technology companies are rising on deal news.

Energy companies were also moving higher along with the price of oil. Chevron rose 1 percent.

The Dow Jones industrial average rose 100 points, or 0.6 percent, to 18,225.

The Standard & Poor’s 500 index climbed 10 points, or 0.5 percent, to 2,150. The Nasdaq composite gained 21 points, or 0.4 percent, to 5,265.

The yield on the 10-year Treasury note held at 1.69 percent.


9:35 a.m.

Stocks are moving higher in early trading, led by gains in technology and industrial companies.

Energy stocks were also up in the first few minutes of trading Monday, following the price of crude oil higher.

General Motors was up 3 percent and Applied Materials gained 2 percent.

The Dow Jones industrial average rose 82 points, or 0.5 percent, to 18,207.

The Standard & Poor’s 500 index climbed 22 points, or 0.4 percent, to 2,148. The Nasdaq composite gained 22 points, or 0.4 percent, to 5,266.

The yield on the 10-year Treasury note held at 1.69 percent.