LINCOLN, Neb. — An art exhibition in Lincoln will feature a number of dramatic works, but don’t expect a chat with the artists. They’re behind bars.

The 16 works — both visual and written pieces — will be on display at Indigo Bridge Books in Lincoln through Oct. 31, the Lincoln Journal Star reported ( ).

The exhibit, “Captive Creativity: Dispatches from Tecumseh,” features the works of nine inmates from the maximum security Tecumseh State Correctional Institution.

Becca Ross, of Lincoln, helped organize the display. About half the works will be for sale, she said, with proceeds directly supporting the artists.

In addition, donations will be collected for a books-to-prisoners project.

“There isn’t really an efficient program for prisoners in Nebraska to get books if their family can’t send them,” Ross said.

The idea for the exhibit was born after Ross began corresponding with a few inmates after the May 2015 riot at the prison. Ross said she wanted to get their perspective on what was happening.

“I wanted to see if they needed outside support in any way,” Ross said. “So many times, the story is only told from one perspective, (because) it’s hard to communicate with prisoners.”

One of the artists, Chris Garza, works as a drafter at Cornhusker State Industries, according to a biographical sketch that accompanies his art. Garza, 43, is serving more than 90 years in prison for killing a 17-year-old girl in 1990.

“To be able to paint like I do is a gift from the Creator,” Garza said. “As with all of the gifts I have been given, I take it very seriously and am thankful.”

Information from: Lincoln Journal Star,

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