OMAHA, Neb. — A 9-year-old Omaha boy has been arrested at school on suspicion of second-degree felony assault for allegedly throwing a rock at an 8-year-old boy and severely injuring him.

The Druid Hill Elementary School third-grader was booked Wednesday at the Douglas County Youth Center and released to his mother, the Omaha World-Herald (http://bit.ly/2qcZoK0 ) reported.

“I think it’s ridiculous. I think a 9-year-old shouldn’t be escorted from a school by the police,” said Tiffanie Moore, the boy’s mother. “I found out later that the police read my son his (Miranda) rights. Who thinks a 9-year-old understands his rights?”

Moore said she’s in the process of retaining an attorney and is waiting to get a court date for her son.

“I don’t know why they went to school for something that happened outside our house,” Moore said. “This didn’t happen at school.”

The Omaha Police Department said in a statement that the situation could’ve been handled better and that an arrest at the school wasn’t necessary.

Moore said her son and his older sister told her they were outside their house April 23 when the boy picked up a rock and threw it. He apparently told his sister and neighbor Dorian Chambers to duck, “but the little boy didn’t duck.”

Dorian has undergone surgery for a brain bleed and is taking anti-seizure medication.

“Our whole family has been traumatized by this,” said Crystal Stewart, Dorian’s grandmother. “The doctor in the hospital said he’d never seen anything like this from a rock. He said it’s more like a hammer or baseball bat his (Dorian’s) head.”

Moore said she understands why Dorian’s family would want to press charges, but she’s angry that police arrested her son without first contacting her.

Deputy prosecutor Nicole Brundo said no charges have been filed yet.


Information from: Omaha World-Herald, http://www.omaha.com

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