FORT WAYNE, Ind. — Indiana University-Fort Wayne won’t have a chancellor next year after the dismantling of Indiana University-Purdue University Fort Wayne.

The campus will have fewer students and faculty to administer, which doesn’t justify having a chancellor, said John Applegate, executive vice president for academic affairs. Applegate told The Journal Gazette (http://bit.ly/2qk5Q3P ) the job and title of the campus’ leader hasn’t been determined.

The five other Indiana University regional campuses are led by a chancellor.

For more than 50 years, Indiana University-Purdue University Fort Wayne was jointly operated with Purdue as the managing partner. The Purdue and Indiana University boards approved plans in December for splitting up programs effective July 2018, at what is now Indiana University-Purdue University Fort Wayne.

Purdue will oversee the current campus and most programs, while Indiana University will manage medical and social work programs.

Over the years, Indiana University conducted four studies of Indiana University-Purdue University Fort Wayne and found many complaints about how the joint universities functioned, Applegate said.

He said the campus was giving the impression that things were not working and something had to be done.

Declining enrollment was of big concern for the universities. Dr. Michael Mirro, who specializes in cardiology and is an Indiana University trustee, said the separation will allow both schools to better address the enrollment issue.

“I think we’ll see the reversal of the downward turn in enrollment by doing this,” Mirro said.


Information from: The Journal Gazette, http://www.journalgazette.net

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