MONTGOMERY, Ala. — The Latest on the U.S. Senate race in Alabama (all times local):

6 p.m.

Political parties in Alabama have closed qualifying in the race to fill Attorney General Jeff Sessions’ former seat in the U.S. Senate.

Qualifying ended Wednesday with a crowded field in both the GOP and Democratic parties. Eleven Republicans and eight Democrats will compete for Sessions’ old Senate seat.

The seat is now held by Republican Sen. Luther Strange, who was appointed by the state’s former governor and is a candidate in the race.

The others in the GOP field are U.S. Rep. Mo Brooks, former Alabama Supreme Court Chief Justice Roy Moore, Christian Coalition President Randy Brinson, Birmingham businessman Dom Gentile, state Sen. Trip Pittman, Bryan Peeples, Mary Maxwell, Joseph F. Breault, James Paul Beretta and Karen Haiden Jackson.

Eight Democrats are seeking the seat: former U.S. Attorney Doug Jones, Will Boyd, Vann Caldwell, Jason Fisher, Michael Hansen, Robert Kennedy Jr., Brian McGee and Nana Tchienkou.


4:15 p.m.

Sen. Luther Strange has filed qualifying papers as he seeks to hold on to the Senate seat previously held by Jeff Sessions.

Strange filed papers Wednesday with the Alabama Republican Party. He had previously announced his intention to run.

Wednesday is the final day to qualify for the Aug. 15 primary.

Other Republicans contenders include: U.S. Rep. Mo Brooks; former Supreme Court Chief Justice Roy Moore; state Rep. Ed Henry; Christian Coalition president Randy Brinson; and Birmingham businessman Dom Gentile.

Former Gov. Robert Bentley appointed Strange to the seat after Sessions was confirmed as attorney general.

Qualifying closes at 5 p.m.


10:30 a.m.

Republican state Senate leader Del Marsh of Alabama will not get into the race to fill Attorney General Jeff Sessions’ former seat in the US. Senate.

Marsh said Wednesday he decided against seeking the seat now held by Republican Luther Strange. Gov. Robert Bentley resigned in April in the wake of a sex-tinged scandal. Marsh says state government needs stability.

Marsh is arguably the most powerful politician in state politics and has deep ties to the state’s business community.

Strange was appointed by Bentley and is seeking election. Other Republicans contenders include: U.S. Rep. Mo Brooks, former Supreme Court Chief Justice Roy Moore; state Rep. Ed Henry; Christian Coalition president Randy Brinson; and Birmingham businessman Dom Gentile.

Party qualifying ends Wednesday evening. The primary is Aug. 15.