TOPEKA, Kan. — The Latest on the Kansas Legislature attempting to wrap up work on budget legislation and adjourn its session (all times local):

7:48 p.m.

Kansas legislators have finished their work and adjourned their annual session except for a brief, formal ceremony to mark its end.

The Senate adjourned at 5:45 p.m. It did so shortly after passing a bill containing budgets for the fiscal year beginning July 1 and for the following fiscal year.

The House passed the same bill and adjourned at 6:55 p.m.

The only scheduled business left for lawmakers is a brief adjournment ceremony scheduled for June 26. However, they can do business on that day if necessary.

Saturday was the 113th day of what was supposed to be a 100-day session. Only 2015’s session was longer at 114 days.


6:49 p.m.

The Kansas House has approved budget legislation that includes pay raises of up to 5 percent for state workers who haven’t had increases in recent years.

The vote Saturday was 88-27 and came after the Senate approved the measure 27-11. The bill goes next to Gov. Sam Brownback.

The measure includes a $15.6 billion budget for the fiscal year beginning July 1 and a $15.8 billion budget for the one beginning in July 2018.

Employees who’ve worked for the state five or more years would get a raise if they haven’t had one within five years.

Other workers would get a 2.5 percent raise if they haven’t had a raise in the past two years.

But all court system employees would get a 2.5 percent raise.


5:28 p.m.

The Kansas Senate has approved budget legislation that includes pay raises of up to 5 percent for state workers who haven’t had increases in recent years.

The Senate’s vote Saturday was 27-11. The bill includes a $15.6 billion budget for the fiscal year beginning July 1 and a $15.8 billion budget for the one beginning in July 2018.

The House also hoped to vote on the measure Saturday. Its approval would send the bill to Republican Gov. Sam Brownback.

Employees with the state five or more years would get a raise if they haven’t had one within five years.

Other workers would get a 2.5 percent raise if they haven’t had a raise in the past two years.

But all court system employees would get a 2.5 percent raise.

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2:10 p.m.

Kansas legislators are considering a plan to give pay raises of up to 5 percent to state workers who haven’t had any in recent years.

Both the Senate and the House hoped to vote Saturday on a single bill containing proposed state budgets for the fiscal year beginning July 1 and the one starting in July 2018.

Legislative negotiators included money for a 5 percent raise to any employee who’s been with the state for five or more years but hasn’t seen a pay increase.

Workers would get a 2.5 percent raise if they’ve been with the state less than five years and haven’t had a raise in the past two years.

All court system employees would get a 2.5 percent raise. Their pay is often well below market rates.