OXFORD, Miss. — The Latest on a proposal to release an inmate convicted of killing a Mississippi police officer (all times local):

7 p.m.

Early release is no longer being considered for an inmate convicted in the 2006 killing of a University of Mississippi police officer.

The Mississippi Department of Corrections notified victims, law enforcement officials and court officials Thursday that 31-year-old Daniel Cummings would be released from prison July 28.

Department spokeswoman Grace Simmons Fisher says Friday that after receiving objections from victims and the community, Corrections Commissioner Pelicia Hall is no longer considering early release for Cummings.

He was sentenced to 20 years after pleading guilty in 2007 to manslaughter for the dragging death of officer Robert Langley.

Cummings was a second-year University of Mississippi student when 30-year-old Langley pulled him over in traffic in October 2006. Cummings drove away, dragging the officer more than 200 yards. Prosecutors said Cummings had drugs and alcohol in his system.

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3:50 p.m.

A prosecutor says he will try to block the state’s planned release of an inmate convicted in the 2006 killing of a University of Mississippi police officer.

The Oxford Eagle reports the Mississippi Department of Corrections issued a notice Thursday that 31-year-old Daniel Cummings will be released from prison July 28.

Cummings was sentenced to 20 years after pleading guilty in 2007 to manslaughter for the dragging death of officer Robert Langley.

Cummings was a second-year University of Mississippi student when 30-year-old Langley pulled him over in traffic in October 2006. Cummings drove away, dragging the officer more than 200 yards. Prosecutors said Cummings had drugs and alcohol in his system.

District Attorney Ben Creekmore says he will file an objection to Cummings’ release.


This story has been corrected to show the commissioner’s first name is spelled Pelicia.


Information from: Oxford Eagle, http://www.oxfordeagle.com

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