DENVER — Colorado’s Medicaid program is rolling out a two-phase plan to lessen the number of opioid drugs in circulation.

The Denver Post reported (http://dpo.st/2vWKoSu ) Monday that the program will be reducing the amount of opioid painkillers it allows recipients to receive starting in August.

The second phase calls for reducing the total dosage of opioids that all patients can receive.

Medicaid currently won’t pay for recipients to receive more than 300 morphine milligram equivalents per day. But the new policy will lower that maximum measurement to 250.

Dr. Judy Zerzan, the chief medical officer for Colorado’s Department of Health Care Policy and Financing, said the state will likely look at reducing that limit further, but wants to ensure patients on a high dose are weaned slowly to avoid pain or withdrawal.


Information from: The Denver Post, http://www.denverpost.com

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