HONOLULU — The Latest on a hearings officer’s recommendation to grant a permit for an embattled Hawaii telescope project (all times local):

5:45 p.m.

The executive director of an embattled Hawaii telescope project says he’s looking forward to the next steps now that a hearings officer has recommended granting a key permit.

Thirty Meter Telescope Executive Director Ed Stone says officials welcome the recommendation Wednesday that a state permit be issued that will allow for construction on Hawaii’s Mauna Kea.

The project has been stalled amid intense protests that the telescope would desecrate land held sacred by some Native Hawaiians.

Retired judge Riki May Amano’s recommendation isn’t the last step. Telescope opponents and permit applicants may file arguments with the state land board.

The board will hold a hearing and make the final decision.

A second round of contested-case hearings was necessary after the state Supreme Court invalidated an earlier permit issued by the board.


5 p.m.

A hearings officer is recommending that a construction permit be granted for a giant telescope planned for a Hawaii mountain summit that some consider sacred.

Retired judge Riki May Amano is overseeing contested-case hearings for the Thirty Meter Telescope and issued her recommendation Wednesday. The $1.4 billion project has divided those who believe the telescope will desecrate land held sacred by some Native Hawaiians and those who believe it will provide Hawaii with economic and educational opportunities.

Now that Amano has made her recommendation, telescope opponents and permit applicants may file arguments with the state land board.

The board will hold a hearing and make the final decision.

A second round of contested-case hearings was necessary after the state Supreme Court invalidated an earlier permit issued by the board.

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