FLORENCE, Ariz. — An Arizona inmate will serve an additional 20 years in prison for plotting to kill a prosecutor and two prison investigators.

Raymond Olson, 35, pleaded guilty to multiple counts of solicitation to commit first-degree murder in May, the Casa Grande Dispatch reported (http://bit.ly/2weaUXB). He will serve 20 years in prison in addition to his previous 10-year prison sentence for a street gang charge outside of Maricopa County, in south-central Arizona.

The FBI interviewed a Florence prison inmate in 2014 who gave investigators notes written by Olson where he described plans to kill Maricopa County deputy attorney Ellen Dahl and state Department of Corrections employees Brandon Rodarte and Lance Uehling, according to the defendant’s presentence report.

All three had a hand in investigating and prosecuting Olson.

The Arizona Department of Public Safety confirmed the notes were from Olson.

In the notes, Olson wrote that the murder plot would be carried out by his fellow Aryan Brotherhood white supremacist gang members who were about to be released from prison.

Olson’s notes were not filled with empty words, and he came dangerously to unfolding his plan, prosecutors said.

The FBI followed an Aryan member who met up with Olson’s wife in Mesa in June 2015. The two discussed Olson’s plan to obtain the addresses for his three targets, according to investigators. They suspect one of the state Department of Corrections employees’ addresses was circulated.

Olson declined to make a statement during the sentencing hearing.

He will begin serving his new 20-year sentence after he completes his previous sentence in a couple of years. .


Information from: Casa Grande Dispatch.

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