ALLIANCE, Ohio — Isaac Williamson loves to be outdoors and play sports, but there is one activity he performs better than others across Ohio.

At an age when most kids are just getting their training wheels removed, Isaac Williamson is tearing up dirt tracks on his own motorcycles.

Isaac, a Lexington Township second-grader, recently became a state motocross champion, earning first place in the Ohio Motocross Association’s “Battle for Ohio” competition in his division.

In motocross, riders try to complete a course in the shortest time possible. Winners are determined by a point system.

His room is filled with trophies, said his mom, Andrea, who admits she was worried when Isaac first took up riding. Her husband, Scott, raced motorcycles.

“He got a little four-wheeler for his fourth birthday,” she said. “I was concerned until I saw he knew what he was doing.”

Isaac entered his first race at 6, competing at Switchback Arena in Butler, Pa. He has since competed in New York, New Jersey, North Carolina and recently in Malvern.

“I’ve been everywhere,” he said.

In June, he competed in the two-day Mid-East Youth Regional Loretta Lynne Qualifier in Chillicothe.

Williamson also has competed in (and won) races at the Wiseco Super Series, Kames Saturday Night Series and the Oho Motocross Association Overall Series. He was selected “Rider of the Race” by Malvern Motocross Park and will be featured in MotoPlayground, a national magazine.

It helps that Williamson is a natural athlete who plays football, baseball, basketball, soccer, wrestling and tennis.

“This boy loves all kinds of sports,” his mom said. “He doesn’t really play that many video games. Any chance we get, we’re outside.”

Isaac, who owns two 50cc shaft-drive Yamahas, practices every day. Scott Williamson is in the process of building his son his own practice track.

Last Saturday, Isaac raced at Malvern Motocross Park, winning the 50cc Shaft Drive class. He also took second places in the Junior Class with his larger motorcycle, a Cobra Junior, marking only the second time racing his larger bike.

He also has several professional sponsors.

His budding career nearly was detoured last October, when he underwent surgery at Akron Children’s Hospital to remove a potentially cancerous birthmark from his right leg. It prevented him from strenuous activity for two months.

“It was a long eight weeks for this kid because he loves sports,” his mother said.

Isaac, who plans to be a professional racer, said he has never been afraid.

“I never let go of the throttle,” he said.


Information from: The Repository, http://www.cantonrep.com

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CHARITA GOSHAY
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