HONOLULU — County clerks in Hawaii are releasing limited voter information to President Donald Trump’s commission investigating alleged voter fraud, but the clerks from Honolulu, Kauai and Hawaii counties said Thursday they’re providing far less information than what the commission wants.

The commission had asked for voters’ names, party affiliations, addresses and voting histories if state law allows release. Hawaii law only permits counties to release names, precinct information and whether a voter has participated in the last two elections.

“If or when we give them this publicly available list of peoples’ names and precinct numbers, that’s not enough for them to do their job,” said Honolulu County Clerk Glen Takahashi. “It’s actually useless information.”

Takahashi said he’s received calls from voters who are considering cancelling their voter registration instead of having their information disclosed to the federal government. He said he tries to reassure them that their personal information is safeguarded.

Hawaii does not collect party affiliations from registered voters. Those who want to participate in primary elections register directly with the political parties.

“We don’t really have concerns about privacy, because there’s no personal information besides their name that is on that list,” said Hawaii County Clerk Stewart Maeda.

The initial request from Trump’s commission was delayed by lawsuits until a federal judge cleared the way for states to comply. As of Wednesday, 14 states and the District of Columbia had said they would not hand over the information, according to an Associated Press tally.

Takahashi says he expects the Trump administration to follow up and request more information, but “that’s where I draw the line and say no.”

Maui County clerks didn’t respond to requests for comment. Their counterparts say all four counties agreed to send the information.