AMES, Iowa — The interim president of Iowa State University has proposed increasing resident undergraduate tuition 7 percent every year for the next five years.

President Ben Allen told an Iowa Board of Regents task force Wednesday that the university’s enrollment has risen by 37 percent since 2009, but that state appropriations for operations have declined by 30 percent. That means the university received nearly $4,000 less in state support for every resident student than in 2009.

“We have reached a breaking point,” Allen said.

Resident undergraduates are scheduled to pay nearly $7,500 in tuition for the upcoming academic year. A 7 percent increase would raise costs by more than $520 for the 2018-19 academic year, and the tuition total would reach nearly $10,500 for the 2022-23 academic year.

The proposal asked to increase tuition for nonresident undergraduates by 4 percent every year for the next five years. Nonresidents currently are expected to pay more than $21,000 in tuition for the upcoming school year. They’d see a nearly $900 increase for the 2018-19 academic year, and tuition would rise to almost $26,000 by the 2022-23 academic year.

The proposal also suggested raising tuition for students majoring in engineering and business as well as some science, technology and experimental programs because of the higher cost of those programs.

“We have established a five-year tuition proposal that provides the resources to make significant progress on our strategic priorities, and we believe it is a proactive, reasonable approach for our students and their families,” Allen said. “It will allow us to make new investments to maintain educational quality and protect the value of an Iowa State degree.”

The task force took no action Wednesday but is expected to make a report to the full board next month. The regents created the task force in response to more than $30 million in state funding cuts.