FARGO, N.D. — A newborn infant was found in a Fargo apartment building Thursday where a missing pregnant woman was last seen, and police were questioning two people in her disappearance.

Investigators don’t know yet whether the infant is the child of 22-year-old Savanna Greywind, who was last seen at her apartment Saturday afternoon.

In a videotaped statement, Fargo Police Chief Dave Todd gave no details about the two people being questioned, and said police had no new information about Greywind’s whereabouts.

“We ask people to be patient with us because this is at a critical juncture of the investigation and we want to make sure we’re as thorough as possible so that we can give the correct answers to all the questions that people have,” Todd said.

Todd didn’t say where the infant was found, only that the child was discovered as officers carried out a search warrant in “the suspect residence.” Cass County Court officials said Thursday there were “search warrants in the queue” but nothing had been filed as of the close of court Thursday.

Todd didn’t immediately respond to messages for further comment.

Tarita Silk, a sister-in-law of Greywind’s mother, said police informed the family that a “2-day-old healthy baby girl” was taken from the apartment where Greywind lived with her parents, according to KFGO radio. An earlier police search of the apartment came up empty, the station reported.

Todd said his department is receiving help from outside agencies and that officers have used aircraft, watercraft and police dogs in trying to find her. Searches in the Fargo and Grand Forks areas have not been successful so far.

Silk said some family members were searching an area in Minnesota 30 miles east of Fargo after receiving a tip.

“We just want Savanna to come home. We’re prepared for the worst,” Silk said. “The biggest thing now is for anybody who has any information … to come forward.”

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DAVE KOLPACK
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