ANCHORAGE, Alaska — An Anchorage man severely beaten and taken to hospital in a dog kennel may have owed money to one of his suspected assailants, according to documents released in the case.

An Anchorage grand jury last week indicted four men on attempted murder, kidnapping and assault charges in the beating of Abshir Mohamed, 34. A home security video camera recorded Mohamed being stomped and beaten with a baseball bat and a metal broom handle, police said.

On Aug. 13, Mohamed was delivered in the back of a pickup to a hospital while bound, gagged and stuffed into a black metal wire-frame dog kennel.

The pickup driver is not a suspect in the beating. According to investigators, the driver was ordered at gunpoint to back into a garage on Anchorage’s east side, where the suspects loaded the kennel into his truck and told him they never wanted to see him or Mohamed again.

The indictment names Macauther Vaifanua, 28, Faamanu Vaifanua, 27, Jeffery Ahvan, 29 and Rex Faumui, 24.

Ahvan is in custody. The other three are at large and described as “armed and dangerous.”

A phone and email message left with Ahvan’s attorney, assistant public defender Chong Yim, was not immediately returned.

Mohamed earlier this week remained in critical condition with a brain injury and multiple facial bone, skull and left hand fractures.

In interviews with Mohamed’s friends, police were told Mohamed owed about $3,000 to Macauther Vaifanua and that he was afraid of him.

The day of the beating, a friend drove him to Vaifanua’s home, waited for two hours and then left.

Police obtained search warrants for Vaifanua’s home and found a bloody baseball bat. Footage from a security camera in the garage recorded the beating “in vivid and unobstructed color,” police said in a criminal complaint. The suspects were aware of the camera and laughed and pointed to it, police said.

The video showed Mohamed face down in the garage, his legs tied and his arms bound behind his back. Police said the video showed Faamanu Vaifanua stomping Mohamed’s head to the concrete floor and Macauther Vaifanua beating his torso and legs with the metal broom handle hard enough to bend the handle.

Faamanu Vaifanua, according to police, beat Mohamed in the face, torso and legs with the baseball bat.

The pickup driver, who acknowledged that he was a methamphetamine user, was summoned from the street, where he had been talking to his girlfriend. He told police he did not know the man who asked him to back his truck into the garage, a story that investigators found implausible.

The suspects loaded Mohamed, still in the cage, into the bed of the man’s truck, covered the kennel with a blanket, took the driver’s phone and ordered him to leave. The pickup driver said he drove to a grocery store, saw Mohamed in the kennel, bought something to drink and drove to the hospital emergency room.

Author photo
DAN JOLING
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