JACKSON, Miss. — The Latest on the possible state takeover of Mississippi’s second-largest school district (all times local):

5 p.m.

A spokesman says Mississippi Gov. Phil Bryant will carefully consider whether to declare an “extreme emergency” in the state’s second-largest school district.

The state Board of Education voted Thursday to recommend that Bryant make the declaration about Jackson Public Schools because of academic and accountability problems. The governor must take the step before the state can take over the district with 27,000 students.

Bryant spokesman Knox Graham says the governor does not have a timetable for making his decision.

The School Accreditation Commission said it found several problems in the district. Allegations include seniors graduating without showing they met requirements, teachers providing ineffective instruction and schools being unsafe.

The state has taken over several school districts in the past, but never one as large as Jackson’s.

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4:20 p.m.

Mississippi’s second-largest school district is one step closer to being taken over by the state, but some parents are vowing a legal fight.

The state Board of Education voted Thursday to recommend that Gov. Phil Bryant declare an “extreme emergency” in Jackson Public Schools. The board also chose Margie Pulley to become interim superintendent. Pulley was conservator for Tunica County School District after it was taken over by the state.

The School Accreditation Commission recommended the state board declare an emergency in the Jackson district, with 27,000 students.

Allegations against the district include seniors graduating without showing they met requirements, teachers providing ineffective instruction and schools being unsafe.

Dorsey Carson, an attorney with a daughter in a Jackson school, says he will file suit, seeking to block a takeover.

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3:26 p.m.

The Mississippi Board of Education is discussing a possible takeover of the state’s second-largest school district because of academic and accountability problems.

Board members heard arguments Thursday for and against a state takeover of Jackson Public Schools. The nine board members then went into closed session for discussion.

The School Accreditation Commission recommended that the board declare an “extreme emergency” in the district in the capital city, which has about 27,000 students.

Freddrick Murray, who has been interim superintendent since November, argued that the district has made improvements and should get more time to continue solving problems.

Allegations against the district include seniors graduating without showing they met requirements, teachers providing ineffective instruction and schools being unsafe.