ST. JOSEPH, Mo. — In a story Sept. 18 about opioid overdose medication, The Associated Press reported erroneously that Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens signed an executive order in July that made the medication available over the counter. The medication is available over the counter but the governor’s executive order did not address the issue.

A corrected version of the story is below:

Missouri Highway Patrol carrying opioid overdose drug

The Missouri State Highway Patrol troopers will all be carrying an opioid overdose reversal medication

ST. JOSEPH, Mo. — The Missouri State Highway Patrol troopers will all be carrying an opioid overdose reversal medication once they complete training.

The News-Press reports troopers, park rangers and conservation agents gathered at the patrol’s headquarters last month for training on how to use Naloxone, also known as Narcan.

Patrol superintendent Col. Sandra Karsten directed the troopers to prepare to carry and be able to use Narcan.

The drug has been stored in ambulances for several years, but troopers will carry it as a means to bridge the gap until a paramedic arrives. Troopers are being trained to use the nasal spray version, which works in about two to five minutes.

Author photo
The AP is one of the largest and most trusted sources of independent newsgathering. AP is neither privately owned nor government-funded; instead, as a not-for-profit news cooperative owned by its American newspaper and broadcast members, it can maintain its single-minded focus on newsgathering and its commitment to the highest standards of objective, accurate journalism.