INDIANAPOLIS — Indianapolis Public Schools will require up to 350 teachers to reapply for jobs after its board voted to close three of its seven high schools next year.

District officials told the Indianapolis Star that they don’t expect to cut any teaching positions because the number of students shouldn’t change, despite the board’s decision Monday to close Broad Ripple, Arlington and Northwest high schools.

The district will host open houses for teachers and schedule interviews for each teacher at their top-choice school.

“We felt like this was the most fair and equitable process, given the massive change at the high schools,” said Mindy Schlegel, human resource officer for the school district. “We’re really (looking at) at these four high schools to be four new schools.”

About 110 teachers with special positions or certifications, such as arts or special education, won’t have to reapply.

Principals will be announced for the remaining high schools over the next few weeks, Schlegel said. They’ll then begin the process of hiring their administrative teams and teachers.

The district’s shrinking enrollment played a part in the closure. The district has just over 5,000 high school students, though buildings could accommodate up to 15,000.

The closings are also part of the district’s plan to create an all-choice model. Schools would feature career academies and allow students to choose their high school based on its program, rather than its location.

“This is not a facilities plan,” Superintendent Lewis Ferebee said. “It is an academics plan.”

Officials plan to reopen the Arlington and Northwest facilities as middle schools. The district may also host an evening high school program at Arlington. The district is looking to sell the Broad Ripple campus.

The district will operate four high schools next year: Tech, Attucks, Shortridge and Washington.


Information from: The Indianapolis Star, http://www.indystar.com

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