GRISWOLD, Conn. — The catchphrase “dirt don’t hurt” could not have been more appropriate for Sunday’s Tuff Buddy mud course in Griswold.

There was plenty of dirt, including a muddy water pit that children had to crawl through in order to complete the obstacle course set up by volunteers from the Quinebaug River Church at the Camputaro Memorial Field off Sheldon Road.

“The ending with all the mud was my favorite probably, because I like to get dirty,” Tiernan Curran, 9, of Griswold, said after completing the course. Tiernan and other children around him were covered from feet to shoulders in dried brown mud.

More than 250 kids were registered to try the course Sunday, and organizers expected about 50 more walk-ins to show up and register.

This is the second year the church has held the mud course for children.

“We work in conjunction with the town’s park and recreation department,” activities coordinator Jennifer Thompson said. “It’s one of the longer courses in Eastern Connecticut.”

Among the other obstacles along the trail were wooden climbing walls and swinging ropes to simulate vines, a zip line, a monkey swing and makeshift bridges.

“My favorite was jumping off the walls,” Owen Hamilton, “almost 10? years old, said.

Between two trees was a suspended rope that Lochlan Curran, 5, carefully walked, putting one foot in front of the other on the rope in order to stay balanced on it. He also held onto two ropes that formed hand rails for the young participants to steady themselves.

The children not only enjoyed getting dirty. After running the course, they sprinted over to a waiting fire department water tanker truck, where a firefighter used a hose to spray them all down with water and wash the dirt off.

Having been cleaned off they then went back onto the course, of course.


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For more information: The Norwich Bulletin, www.norwichbulletin.com

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RYAN BLESSING
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