INDIANAPOLIS — The Latest on a federal judge’s order permanently blocking Indiana from enforcing provisions of an abortion law passed last year (all times local):

4 p.m.

Indiana plans to appeal a federal judge’s order that permanently blocks the state from enforcing a provision of a law passed last year that would ban abortions sought due to fetal genetic abnormalities.

Attorney General Curtis Hill said Monday in a statement that he’s disappointed by Friday’s ruling and plans to appeal to the 7th Circuit Court of Appeals in Chicago.

U.S. District Judge Tanya Walton Pratt issued an order Friday permanently blocking the state from banning abortions sought due to fetal genetic abnormalities and from requiring that aborted fetuses be buried or cremated. Pratt’s ruling says the provisions violate women’s due process rights under the Constitution and “directly contravene well-established law.”

Hill says the ruling clears “the path for genetic discrimination that once seemed like science fiction.” He adds that the law’s fetal disposal provision “is hardly an impingement of anyone’s individual rights.”


10:22 a.m.

A judge has permanently blocked Indiana from enforcing provisions of a law banning abortions sought due to fetal genetic abnormalities and requiring that aborted fetuses be buried or cremated.

U.S. District Judge Tanya Walton Pratt issued a permanent injunction on Friday sought by Planned Parenthood of Indiana and Kentucky that prevents Indiana from enforcing the restrictions then-Gov. Mike Pence signed into law in March 2016.

Pratt’s order makes permanent her June 2016 order that temporarily blocked the state from enforcing the fetal disposal provision, the ban on abortions sought due to genetic abnormalities such as Down syndrome and a requirement that abortion providers tell women Indiana prohibits such abortions.

Pratt’s ruling says the three provisions violate women’s due process rights under the Constitution and “directly contravene well-established law.”