NEW YORK — In a story Sept. 28 about Metropolitan Transportation Authority screening program for sleep apnea, The Associated Press erroneously reported comments made by the authority’s chairman, Joe Lhota. Lhota praised the authority’s system of screening bus and train drivers for sleep apnea but said he would look into whether it was possible to shorten the amount of time drivers are given to seek expert testing for the illness after a screening indicated they might be at risk. He did not say that he wanted to fix a flaw in the rules. The AP also incorrectly described details of the screening system. Drivers can’t “fail” a screening exam. The exam also doesn’t result in a diagnosis, only mandates that drivers get tested by a medical professional within 90 days.

A corrected version of the story is below:

MTA chairman: Transit workers should be treated for sleep apnea “as fast as possible.”

Metropolitan Transportation Authority chairman Joe Lhota says the New York agency has a strong system of screening bus drivers and train operators for sleep apnea, but he would look into whether it was possible to shorten the amount of time drivers are given to seek expert testing for the illness after a screening indicated they might be at risk.

NEW YORK — Metropolitan Transportation Authority chairman Joe Lhota says the New York agency has a strong system of screening bus drivers and train operators for sleep apnea, but he would look into whether it was possible to shorten the amount of time drivers are given to seek expert testing for the illness after a screening indicated they might be at risk.

Under the MTA’s program, drivers are given an exam and a questionnaire that look for risk factors for the disease, like poor sleeping patterns or a high body mass index.

Transit workers identified as being at risk are required to get an examination and testing by a medical expert, but are allowed to work for up to 90 days while they wait for a diagnosis.

In response to a reporter’s question Wednesday, Lhota said he would “look into whether or not it can be done any faster. Because I would like to see it done as fast as possible.”