SALT LAKE CITY — The Latest on Mormon leaders not attending conference due to health (all times local):

3:05 p.m.

Mormon President Thomas S. Monson won’t attend this weekend’s church conference due to his ailing health.

Church spokesman Eric Hawkins confirmed Thursday that the 90-year-old Monson will miss the twice-yearly conference and referred to church’s May statement that Monson is no longer coming to meetings at church offices regularly because of limitations related to his age.

As church president, Monson is considered a prophet, seer and relevator. He oversees the religion’s church and business operations with help from two top counselors and twelve members of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles.

Monson has scaled back conference participation recently and gave just two short speeches at April’s conference. He was hospitalized afterward when he reported “not feeling well.”

The religion also announced Thursday that 85-year-old Robert D. Hales, a member of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles, won’t be at conference either due to ailing health.

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11:46 a.m.

Mormon leader Robert D. Hales has been hospitalized and won’t attend this weekend’s church conference.

Church spokesman Eric Hawkins said Thursday Hales was taken to hospital several days ago for treatment of pulmonary and other conditions. The 85-year-old Hales won’t attend the religion’s twice-yearly conference on advice of his doctors.

Hales has been a member of the faith’s top governing body called the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles since 1994.

He is one of six men among the religion’s top 15 leaders who are older than 84. Church President Thomas S. Monson is 90, and is no longer coming to meetings at church offices regularly because of limitations related to his age.

A native of New York City, Hales was a fighter pilot in the Air Force and business executive before becoming a full-time church leader.

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