JERSEY CITY, N.J. — A capsule look at Friday’s fourballs matches at the Presidents Cup:

Hideki Matsuyama and Adam Hadwin, International, halved with Patrick Reed and Jordan Spieth, United States.

Spieth and Reed were 2 down with four holes to play and disappointed with a halve. Hadwin and Matsuyama lost a 2-up lead with four holes to play and were happy to at least have something out of the match. Matsuyama ran off three birdies on the front nine for a 2-up lead at the turn, and Hadwin’s birdie at the 13th restored the lead to 2 up. The Americans rallied quickly. Reed holed a 15-foot birdie on the 15th, and Spieth hit his tee shot on the par-3 16th to 6 feet for birdie to square the match. The Americans had birdie putts to win the 17th and 18th. Spieth missed from 8 feet, and his 20-foot putt on the 18th hit the left edge and spun out.


Rickie Fowler and Justin Thomas, United States, def. Louis Oosthuizen and Branden Grace, International, 3 and 2.

Oosthuizen and Grace lost for the first time in six matches together at the Presidents Cup, and Oosthuizen lost for the first time since a Saturday foursomes match at Muirfield Village in 2013. They both missed 8-foot putts to win holes early in the match. Fowler made a 15-foot birdie putt on No. 3 for a 1-up lead, and the Americans never trailed. Thomas led the charge over the back end of the match, with two big birdies. He got up-and-down from left the 12th green for birdie to half the hole and stay 2 up. And on the 14th, Grace was 6 feet away for birdie and poised to cut into the lead. Thomas holed his bunker shot for the Americans to stay 2 up, and Thomas birdied the next hole for a 3-up lead.


Phil Mickelson and Kevin Kisner, United States, def. Jason Day and Marc Leishman, International, 1 up.

Mickelson tied Tiger Woods for most matches won (24) in the Presidents Cup, and he did it in style. Day and Leishman opened with four straight birdies for a 2-up lead and the International team was 6 under on the front, though still only 2 up. Kisner’s birdie on the 11th cut the deficit, and Kisner delivered another big birdie putt from 20 feet on the 15th to square the match. It remained tied going to the 18th. Day and Kisner came up short. Mickelson and Leishman hit their tee shots to about 12 feet. Mickelson holed the putt, and Leishman missed.


Kevin Chappell and Charley Hoffman, United States, def. Charl Schwartzel and Anirban Lahiri, International, 6 and 5.

Two of the American rookies who sat out in the opening session made a debut that lasted only 13 holes. The International team was wild off the opening tee and made bogey and conceded Hoffman’s 3-foot eagle attempt on the second hole. Chappell took it from there with birdies on No. 4 and an approach to 4 feet on No. 8. Chappell’s third birdie on the front nine gave his side a 5-up lead at the turn. Lahiri and Schwartzel won only one hole when both players stuffed tee shots on the par-3 10th to 3 feet. Lahiri three-putted from 40 feet to lose the 12th, and Hoffman ended it with a birdie on the 13th.


Dustin Johnson and Brooks Koepka, United States, def. Adam Scott and Jhonattan Vegas, International, 3 and 2.

This had the trappings of the closest match of the day, with each team winning two holes on the front nine and the match all square going to the back. Koepka hit his tee shot on the par-3 10th to 12 feet and made the birdie to give his team its first lead of the match, and Johnson got up-and-down on the reachable par-4 12th for a 2-up lead. Vegas birdied the next hole from 35 feet, and that’s when Johnson took over. He holed a bending, 20-foot birdie putt on No. 15, and then closed out the match on the par-3 16th hole with a tee shot to 5 feet for birdie.

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DOUG FERGUSON
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