COLUMBUS, Ohio — In a story Oct. 1 about Ohio high school sports officials, The Associated Press reported erroneously on a statistic showing how many fewer officials there are. The Ohio High School Athletic Association says the number of people taking certification classes has dropped 40 percent, not that the number of officials has dropped by that amount.

The AP also reported that the association is searching for younger people to officiate. While some recruiting efforts are focusing on younger audiences, the story should have made clear that the group is searching for more officials of all ages.

A corrected version of the story is below:

High school sports continues to lose officials across state

The Ohio High School Athletic Association is searching for younger people to officiate at high school athletic events as the dwindling roster of officials grows older

COLUMBUS, Ohio — The Ohio High School Athletic Association is searching for people to officiate at high school athletic events as the roster of officials dwindles.

The organization says the number of people taking certification classes has dropped about 40 percent since the 2010-2011 school year. The Columbus Dispatch reports the OHSAA has been focusing its recruiting efforts on high school students to find its next generation of officials.

OHSAA officiating registrar Ben Ferree says various factors have contributed to the decline, including low pay, harassment from fans and coaches and strenuous schedules.

Retired official Chris Williams says Ohio’s shortage reflects a larger nationwide problem.


Online: http://ohsaa.org/

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