DENVER — The Latest on a snowstorm in the Colorado mountains (all times local):

11:45 a.m.

A storm that brought up to 18 inches (46 centimeters) of snow to the Colorado mountains has knocked out electricity to 21,600 customers.

Xcel Energy says the problems began Sunday night. The company says crews had restored service to about two-thirds of the customers by mid-day Monday.

Xcel spokesman Mark Stutz says snow-laden trees and branches fell onto power lines, and that high winds blew some lines into each other.

Highway officials closed but later reopened U.S. 6 over Loveland Pass, the east-west route normally taken by trucks carrying hazardous materials to avoid the long Eisenhower Tunnel on Interstate 70.

The resort town of Steamboat Springs reported 18 inches (46 centimeters) Monday. Red Cliff, south of Vail, reported 14 inches (36 centimeters).

Winter Park reported nearly 10 inches (25 centimeters).


11 a.m.

The National Weather Service says an early autumn storm is dropping heavy snow in the northern Colorado mountains.

The resort town of Steamboat Springs reported 18 inches (46 centimeters) Monday. Red Cliff, south of Vail, reported 14 inches (36 centimeters).

Winter Park reported nearly 10 inches (25 centimeters).

The storm prompted highway officials to close U.S. 6 over Loveland Pass, the east-west route normally taken by trucks carrying hazardous materials to avoid the Eisenhower Tunnel in the mountains on Interstate 70.

The tunnel is 1.7 miles (3 kilometers) long.

Highway officials say I-70 is rainy but open.

The Weather Service issued a winter storm warning for the northern mountains and much of northwestern Colorado through midnight.

Snow was also falling in the mountains and foothills just west of Denver.


This story has been corrected to show Loveland Pass, not Vail Pass, was closed.

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