LAME DEER, Mont. — The Latest on the Northern Cheyenne tribal council’s vote to oust the tribal president (all times local):

2:50 p.m.

A Montana Indian tribe has voted to oust the tribe’s president for reportedly neglecting his duties and violating tribal bylaws.

President Jace Killsback says he plans to stay in office because a tribal court ruled Thursday that the complaint against him was not sworn under oath and not specific.

An attorney for Northern Cheyenne Tribal Councilman Dana Eaglefeathers said he filed an amended complaint Thursday with a sworn statement and a list of allegations against Killsback. Killsback said he did not have enough time to respond to the amended complaint before the 9-1 vote to oust him on Friday morning.

The Billings Gazette reports Killsback denied the allegations against him.

It was not clear Friday if the Bureau of Indian Affairs would recognize the council’s vote. Spokeswoman Nedra Darling did not return phone calls seeking comment.

10:15 a.m.

A Montana Indian tribe has voted to oust the tribe’s president for reportedly neglecting his duties and violating tribal bylaws.

President Jace Killsback says he plans to stay in office because a tribal court ruled Thursday that the complaint against him was not sworn under oath and not specific.

An attorney for Northern Cheyenne Tribal Councilman Dana Eaglefeathers said he filed an amended complaint Thursday with a sworn statement and a list of allegations against Killsback. Killsback said he did not have enough time to respond to the amended complaint before the 9-0 vote to oust him on Friday morning.

The Billings Gazette reports Killsback denied the allegations against him.

It was not clear Friday if the Bureau of Indian Affairs would recognize the council’s vote. Spokeswoman Nedra Darling did not return phone calls seeking comment.


Information from: The Billings Gazette, http://www.billingsgazette.com

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