MIAMI — The Latest on tropical weather (all times local):

11 p.m.

Tropical Storm Ophelia has weakened slightly but is still forecast to become a hurricane later in the week.

The National Hurricane Center in Miami said the storm’s top sustained winds Tuesday night were 50 mph (85 kph). Ophelia is in the eastern Atlantic, about 785 miles (1,265 kilometers) southwest of the Azores, and is moving southeast at 6 mph (9 kph).

Forecasters expect the storm to become a hurricane by Thursday.


5 p.m.

Tropical Storm Ophelia has strengthened a little far out in the eastern Atlantic, still forecast to become a hurricane later in the week.

The U.S. National Hurricane Center said at 5 p.m. Tuesday that Ophelia had top sustained winds of 60 mph (95 kph). Its core was located about 785 miles (1,265 kilometers) southwest of the Azores and it was moving to the southeast at 6 mph (9 kph).

Forecasters say Ophelia is expected to become a hurricane by Thursday.

No threats to land are reported at this time.


11 a.m.

Tropical Storm Ophelia is becoming better organized far out in the eastern Atlantic and is expected to become a hurricane later this week.

The U.S. National Hurricane Center said Tuesday that Ophelia was located about 780 miles (1,260 kilometers) west-southwest of the Azores. The storm has maximum sustained winds of 50 mph (85 kph) and is moving southeast at about 5 mph (7 kph).

Forecasters at the Miami center say Ophelia should gain muscle over the next 48 hours en route to becoming a hurricane sometime Thursday.

There are currently no coastal watches or warnings in effect with the storm far out at sea.


5 a.m.

Tropical Storm Ophelia is expected to strengthen to a hurricane as it spins far out over the Atlantic.

The storm’s maximum sustained winds early Tuesday are near 50 mph (85 kph). The U.S. National Hurricane Center says Ophelia is expected to become a hurricane by Wednesday.

The storm is centered about 790 miles (1,270 kilometers) west-southwest of the Azores and is moving southeast near 3 mph (6 kph).

The storm is not currently a threat to any land.