Better efforts to stop domestic violence a good sign from people

Two recent events demonstrated that Columbus residents are committed to raising awareness about and curbing domestic and dating violence: the fifth annual Men Take a Stand march and the third annual Not-So-Newlywed Game.

Although both events have been around for a few years, each showed a desire to push forward in the effort.

Bartholomew Consolidated School Corp. Superintendent Jim Roberts, the main speaker at the Oct. 3 Men Take a Stand march in downtown Columbus, urged the 75 people who participated to do more than participate in the walk once a year. He challenged them to take the mission to another level by mentoring young men in the school system about the proper way to develop healthy relationships, for example. Roberts also suggested that Men Take a Stand participants march in community parades to help spread the message further. He even suggested donations of money to the local Turning Point Domestic Violence Services.

All would be ways to reach more people, spread an important message further and grow the impact of local efforts.

Two days later, on Oct. 5, five married couples participated in the Not-So-Newlywed Game fundraiser for Turning Point, which drew 250 people to The Commons. The local twist on the popular game show was intended to provide fun and laughs, highlight healthy relationships and raise money or Turning Point’s efforts.

It succeeded. The fundraiser generated $40,048 for the nonprofit organization — far outpacing last year’s $26,000 and the inaugural event’s $20,000.

That shows local residents strongly support Turning Point’s mission of prevention and elimination of domestic and dating violence.

All of this is a good sign for the community. Domestic and dating violence have no place here — or anywhere. The fact that residents believe that and are stepping up their efforts and encouraging others to do likewise only strengthens that mission and provides greater support to the local agency that is fighting this problem on the front lines.

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