NEW YORK — A sleek sports car once owned by Steve Jobs could sell for over $300,000 at a December auction β€” practically pocket change compared to some of the million-dollar vehicles that will be offered alongside it.

The Apple founder’s 2000 BMW Z8 convertible is among about 30 sets of hot wheels that will be offered by a variety of consignors at the Dec. 6 sale in Manhattan.

Bidders at the fantasy-fueled RM Sotheby’s auction might steer toward a handsomely earth-toned 1961 Ferrari 250 GT Cabriolet Series II by Pininfarina, which has a pre-sale estimate of about $1.5 million to $1.8 million. They’ll also have the chance to peruse a white, “ultimate street-legal” 1995 Porsche 911 GT2, which has a pre-sale estimate of about $1.1 million to $1.4 million, and a red 1952 Chrysler D’Elegance by Ghia, with a pre-sale estimate of about $900,000 to $1.1 million.

But bidders may instead choose to geek out on Jobs’ former ride β€” a model that served as “a test bed for new engineering technologies,” said the auction house. “While not a car enthusiast per se,” Jobs did have “a penchant for German design.”

The tech genius got his BMW in October 2000 in the minimalist style he is known forβ€” titanium over a black leather interior. He sold it about three years later.

Although it’s changed hands a couple of times, it’s only clocked 15,200 miles (24460.89 kilometers).

The car comes with a copy of its old California registration, under the name “Jobs, Steven P.” It also comes with a hardtop, cover, manuals and a cellphone β€” ironically, a BMW-branded Motorola.

Out of garage space, but not out of bucks? A race suit and helmet might fit the bill. Steve McQueen wore them in the 1971 movie “Le Mans” and they’re expected to sell for $400,000 to $500,000.

Author photo
KILEY ARMSTRONG
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