It pays to recycle during November, when financial incentives make it hard to resist during America Recycles Day activities.

You can save up to $50 in disposal costs by taking advantage of no-charge recycling offers at the Columbus/Bartholomew Recycling Center, 720 S. Mapleton St.

Amnesty Day will be observed from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. Nov. 18 at the recycling center.

Up to four pick-up size or smaller tires, with rims removed, will be accepted at no cost, a savings of $2 to $10 per tire.

You also can drop off up to two CFC or refrigerant-containing appliances for free, a savings of $20.

The center will also accept up to two propane gas tanks at no charge.

In addition, a free document-shredding service will be available from 9 to 11 a.m. that Saturday.

But most of the calls being fielded by the recycling center are to find out whether old televisions and computer monitors can be dropped off for free on Amnesty Day, district director Heather Siesel said.

The answer is no.

The district July 1 began charging a $20 recycling fee for televisions and monitors brought to the recycling center on Mapleton Street and at the landfill off County Road 450S near Walesboro.

Several factors came into play in setting that fee.

Heavy cathode ray tubes in older TV sets are difficult to recycle, Siesel said. For example, the leaded glass cannot be recycled into bottles or jars that contain food products, she said.

With strong sales of state-of-the-art electronics, the number of old TVs and monitors being discarded is increasing. As a result, the amount being charged to the waste management district by its recycling vendor has more than tripled in a year, Siesel said.

So haul your TV to Amnesty Day, but also bring a $20 bill with you.

A related promotion will offer an enticement to recycle on a second day during mid-November, when the Get Caught Recycling event rewards the first 25 people to drop off items at the recycling center Nov. 15 with special gifts.

Déjà vu

The first event commemorating National America Recycles Day this year will be the 13th annual Déjà vu Art and Fine Craft Show.

At least 70 artists will display and sell their art work made from reused, reclaimed and recycle materials from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Nov. 11 at The Commons, said Kari Spurgeon, education coordinator for the waste management district.

Book arts, fiber arts, jewelry, weaving, leather work, mosaic, sculpture and woodworking are just some of the products generated by the artists.

Although many items are purely decorative, some exhibitors such as local art teacher Robin Arnold have become quite skilled at creating practical items, Spurgeon said.

For example, old T-shirts and jeans are imaginatively transformed into bags and purses, and recycled leather is utilized to cover diaries and journals.

About America Recycles Day

America Recycles Day (Nov. 15) sparks thousands of events across the country to raise awareness about the importance of recycling.

Founded in 1997 by the National Recycling Coalition, America Recycles Day has continued through annual presidential proclamations.

Since 2009, the observance has included efforts to convince Americans to offer personal pledges to recycle, as well as buy products made from recycled materials.

Since America Recycles Day falls on a Wednesday this year, most related recycling activities are being held either the weekend before or after the official observance.

Source: National Day Calendar website

If you go

Déjà vu Art and Fine Craft Show: 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Nov. 11 in The Commons, 300 Washington St.

Get Caught Recycling! 7:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Nov. 15 at the Columbus/Bartholomew Recycling Center, 720 S. Mapleton St.

Amnesty Day: 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. Nov. 18 at the recycling center.

General information: Learn more about recycling at the county solid waste management district website. Visit bcswmd.com

See recycling column inside

Kari Spurgeon’s occasional column on recycling appears inside today’s Republic, and it’s on America Recycles Day events. You’ll find it on Page XX.

Author photo
Mark Webber is a reporter for The Republic. He can be reached at mwebber@therepublic.com or 812-379-5636.