MADISON, Wis. — The Latest on policy body camera bill (all times local):

3:30 p.m.

The Wisconsin Assembly has passed a bill that would restrict public access to police body camera footage.

The Assembly passed the bill Thursday on a voice vote. It now heads to the Senate, which could take it up in January.

Democratic opponents say the bill goes too far in restricting who has access to the video and audio captured on police body cameras. Supporters include police departments who say they need guidelines to protect the privacy of people captured on the videos.

The bill puts in place new requirements before footage can be released that’s taken in places where people expect to have privacy, such as their home.

Critics say the limits could even result in footage police may want to be made public from getting released.


1:35 p.m.

The sponsor of a bill limiting public access to policy body camera footage says he’s open to making changes to the proposal.

Republican Rep. Jesse Kremer said Thursday he has worked with Democrats already on changes to the measure and discussions with critics will continue.

The Assembly planned to vote on the bill Thursday, which would send it to the Senate. The soonest it could vote on it is January, and if it makes any changes the Assembly would have to vote on it again.

Critics including the Wisconsin Freedom of Information Council say the bill goes too far in restricting when the public can see footage taken in private places, like a person’s home.

Kremer says his primary concern is protecting privacy rights while also giving police agencies a model policy.


12:45 p.m.

Democrats in the Wisconsin Assembly are saying a Republican proposal limiting public access to police body camera footage is a “missed opportunity.”

The bill is up for a vote Thursday in the Assembly.

Under the proposal, all footage from a police body camera would be exempt from Wisconsin’s open records law except for video involving injuries, deaths, arrests and searches.

But if footage was taken in a place where someone has a reasonable expectation of privacy, police would have to obtain permission from any victims, witnesses and property owners before it could be released to the public.

Democratic state Rep. Chris Taylor says the bill could be “really great” if impediments to public access could be improved.


12:30 a.m.

The Wisconsin Legislature is set to vote on a Republican-backed proposal limiting the public’s access to footage from police body cameras.

The bill up Thursday has the support of law enforcement agencies across the state. Supporters say the goal is to institute privacy protections for members of the public unwittingly captured on police cameras.

Under the proposal, all footage from a police body camera would be exempt from Wisconsin’s open records law except for video involving injuries, deaths, arrests and searches.

But if footage was taken in a place where someone has a reasonable expectation of privacy, police would have to obtain permission from any victims, witnesses and property owners before it could be released to the public.

Opponents say that will result in most video being held back.