GRAND ISLAND, Neb. — Free food and the convenience of mobile carts have led more students in a central Nebraska high school to start their days with nutritious breakfasts.

Grand Island Senior High has converted its breakfast program to a “free-for-all” plan that allows all students to eat breakfast for free regardless of their ability to pay. Students don’t have to be a part of the federal free or reduced-price school nutrition program to participate, the Grand Island Independent reported .

Teachers and staff members are also encouraged to eat breakfast from the mobile carts in order to model the practice of eating breakfast every day, said Kris Spellman, director of nutrition for Grand Island Public Schools.

Spellman said about 200 students were served breakfast in the high school’s two cafeterias under the normal school nutrition rules. That number doubled to about 400 students when the free breakfast program was implemented.

The number increased to at least 800 students when four food carts opened for business at the school, Spellman said.

Food nutrition services placed the mobile food carts in the high school’s hallways for the first time Oct. 16. Freshman Jordi Sinner said she’s eaten a school breakfast every day since the carts’ implementation.

Jordi said she finds the hallway carts more convenient than going to the cafeteria because the carts are closer to students’ first-period classrooms and there tends to be shorter lines.

Spellman said the goal is to get more students to eat morning breakfast, because proper nourishment often helps students to better academic work.


Information from: The Grand Island Independent, http://www.theindependent.com

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