BLOOMINGTON, Ind. — Senior Richard Lagow remains in charge of Indiana’s offense, perhaps for the rest of the season.

“Richard is the starter,” coach Tom Allen said Monday. “That’s not going to change.”

Lagow started the first five games before Peyton Ramsey took over. He has played at his best since replacing an injured Ramsey in the fourth quarter against Maryland on Oct. 21. During that stretch, he has completed 62.1 percent of his passes for 646 yards, six touchdowns and three interceptions.

“He’s been more patient in taking what’s given and not forcing things,” offensive coordinator Mike DeBord said. “He’s more patient with his reads. He’s getting more reps than he did as the backup, so that’s helped. We’re putting together the throw game stuff that suits him.”

Indiana (4-6, 1-6 Big Ten) hosts Rutgers (4-6, 3-4) on Saturday. It needs to win that game and the regular-season finale against Purdue to be eligible for a third straight bowl.

For the season, Lagow has completed 59.4 percent of his passes for 1,327 yards, 10 touchdowns and six interceptions.

“I love it for him,” Allen said of Lagow’s strong recent play. “One of the hardest things I’ve had to do was to make him sit. He had a great attitude. He’s got to keep working. It gives us a different dimension.”

Lagow retained his leadership role despite his demotion. He was solid during last Saturday’s 24-14 win at Illinois that kept the Hoosiers’ bowl hopes alive. He threw for 289 yards and two touchdowns.

Ramsey, battling a lower leg injury, is working to play Saturday. He has completed 65.4 percent of his passes for 1,252 yards, 10 touchdowns and five interceptions.

“He continues to work with the training staff,” Allen said. “He has another week to heal and rehab and get better. We have to get to the point where Peyton is ready to play. He’s getting closer. If we had to have him, he could have gotten some snaps (at Illinois). That will progress.”

The only other Big Ten-ready quarterback on the roster is freshman quarterback Nick Tronti, but coaches don’t want to waste his redshirt status by playing him.

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PETE DIPRIMIO
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