JUNEAU, Alaska — Juneau’s city-run warming shelter will not open Wednesday as scheduled.

The shelter won’t be ready until next month because final details are still being worked out, KTOO-FM reported .

The city is still negotiating with the Alaska Mental Health Trust Authority, which owns the Whittier Avenue property, Housing Officer Scott Ciambor said.

“We’re still working on the final details of the lease, putting the insurance pieces in place,” Ciambor said, “working with service providers on the personnel contract so they can provide staffing.”

The city has selected a former state Department of Public Safety building for the downtown facility. The Juneau Assembly approved $75,000 last week for the facility to shelter up to 25 people overnight throughout the next five months.

It’s budgeted to be open for 100 nights from 11 p.m. to 7 a.m. when temperatures fall below freezing.

The Glory Hole, Juneau’s downtown homeless shelter, has been running at capacity for the past week as overnight temperatures in the city have been hovering in the teens and 20s.

“I have a growing list of people who are suspended for up to a month at a time, and they will literally stand outside my door and ask when the warming center is going to open,” said Kyle Hargrave, the shelter’s deputy director. “Because they’re not allowed to come here and if those individuals are not allowed to come to the Glory Hole, there’s usually no other place to turn.”


Information from: KTOO-FM, http://www.ktoo.org

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