MILWAUKEE — The city of Milwaukee has unveiled a comprehensive plan that takes a public health approach to lowering violence by focusing on its causes and modeling strategies used in other cities.

The city’s Office of Violence Prevention spearheaded the creation of the plan, the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel reported . It’s organized around six broad goals: stop the shooting; promote healing and restorative justice; support children, youth and families; promote economic opportunity; foster safe and strong neighborhoods; and strengthen the coordination of violence prevention efforts.

“I think it establishes a clear vision for all of us to work for and a sense of accountability,” said Reggie Moore, director of the office.

The strategies will focus on 10 neighborhoods: Old North Milwaukee, Harambee, Franklin Heights, Silver Spring, North Division, Amani, Sherman Park, Historic Mitchell, Lincoln Village and Midtown. The neighborhoods were selected based on high crime rates from 2014 to 2016.

The plan will track the rates of assaults, shootings, homicides and youth employment to measure effectiveness. It intentionally doesn’t state an overarching percentage goal for lowering the crime rate.

“We want to be upfront about what’s realistic and possible,” Moore said. “Violence is a very complex issue.

The blueprint is meant to be a guide for the next 10 years. A new council will be created to oversee the plan’s implementation, and will administer annual evaluations and updates. The Milwaukee Violence Prevention Council will be comprised of local residents and representatives from business, faith, government and nonprofit organizations.

Mayor Tom Barrett said he hopes it “creates a new sense of urgency and new momentum.”

The blueprint is scheduled to be discussed Monday before the Common Council’s Public Safety and Health Committee. A series of neighborhood meetings also are planned.


Information from: Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, http://www.jsonline.com

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