MACON, Ga. — Fort Valley’s Freight Depot once served as the agricultural gateway for the Georgia city’s bustling cotton and peach industries.

Now, after decades of neglect, the structure is literally falling apart in the town about 90 miles (145 kilometers) south of Atlanta, The Telegraph reported .

Broken windows behind rusted steel bars, missing planks and overturned plastic furniture in the yard are among the visible signs of neglect, the Macon newspaper reported.

The Georgia Trust for Historic Preservation recently declared the depot one of 10 endangered historic sites on its 2018 “Places in Peril” list.

The annual list is meant to raise awareness about Georgia’s important historic, archaeological and cultural resources that are threatened by such things as demolition, neglect or lack of maintenance.

The 1871 depot features deep, overhanging eaves, round-arched service doors and carved brackets. Only 10 depots of a similar design remain in Georgia, The Telegraph reported.

Plans to save the depot have been in the works for more than a decade.

Other sites on the 2018 list include:

— A.J. Gillen Department Store in Oglethorpe County;

— Bibb City Elementary School in Muscogee County;

— Cuthbert Water Tower in Randolph County;

— Fire Station No. 2 in Floyd County;

— Foster-Thomason-Miller House in Morgan County;

— Kit Jones Vessel constructed on Sapelo Island in McIntosh County;

— National Library Bindery Company in Fulton County;

— Olmsted Linear Park Properties in DeKalb County;

— Underground Savannah in Chatham County.


Information from: The Telegraph, http://www.macontelegraph.com

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