Columbus has prided itself in being a community that is welcoming to all people representing many backgrounds. In that regard, it’s welcome and encouraging to see more millennials moving to the city.

According to a Stateline analysis, Columbus is among the top metropolitan areas in the U.S. in attracting more millennials. The number of people in the city ages 25-34 with a college degree has increased 62 percent since 2010.

That’s a positive, healthy sign.

Reasons Stateline cited were hiring efforts by Cummins Inc., housing prices that still are affordable and opportunities to get involved in a smaller community and make a difference.

We’ve seen that with newcomers who, after checking out Columbus, have determined that they can add to the community. Recent examples have been the opening of businesses such as Columbus Rock Gym and Lucabe Coffee.

It helps that a group such as Columbus Young Professionals is established and can help millennials connect to the community. So, too, will Emerging Leaders United, a new volunteer and philanthropic organization for young professionals.

Communities need young adults willing to get involved so that they can bolster civic involvement and serve as the next generation of local leaders. That’s healthy.

And with more millennials finding Columbus a good place to work, live and play, that’s reason for optimism.

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