PITTSBURGH — A 17-year-old Pittsburgh boy was shot and injured near his school bus stop Friday morning, becoming the third student from his school to be shot this week.

The boy, whose name hasn’t been released, was a junior at Woodland Hills Junior/Senior High School. He is in critical condition with injuries to his abdomen but is expected to survive, said Sgt. Andrew Schurman of the Allegheny County police homicide unit.

The shooting comes four days after another junior at Woodland Hills was shot and killed.

Paramedics were responding to a report of a shooting at 11 p.m. Monday when they found Jerame Turner suffering from multiple gunshot wounds. Turner, a well-liked member of the football team, was taken to a hospital where he died.

A second 911 call led responders to another victim of the same shooting. The 13-year-old boy had a gunshot wound to his arm and is expected to survive. It’s not clear where that child went to school.

Augustus Gray, a 14-year-old eighth grader at Woodland Hills, was shot Saturday and died this week.

The shootings do not appear to be related and the Woodland Hills students aren’t being specifically targeted, a spokesman for Allegheny County District Attorney Stephen Zappala Jr. said Friday.

“Any shooting is tragic, more so when the victims are teens and children,” said Mike Manko. However, “young lives being cut short by guns is not unique to western Pennsylvania,” he said.

Students and staff were trying to process yet another shooting.

“We’re just kind of in shock again now a third time,” Woodland Hills Superintendent Alan Johnson told the Tribune-Review on Friday afternoon. “And all we can do is try to deal with each of these as they come to us and try to help our kids make sense of it and let them know that, when they are in school, they are safe there.”

Johnson said some students were overcome by the news of Friday’s shooting and were allowed to go home early.

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