NASHVILLE, Tenn. — Hundreds gathered in downtown Nashville for a morning of workshops on energizing voters, planning grass-roots events, supporting racial justice and defending immigrant rights before the Nashville women’s march.

Saturday’s workshops were meant to turn the energy of the march into wins at the ballot box in a state Republicans have dominated recently.

Jenny Sheridan Pecoraro of Nashville told The Tennessean that “the whole point is that you do something with this energy and this feeling.” She said it gave those disappointed in the 2016 election results an outlet for their anger and a way to push for change.

Chattanooga Mayor Andy Berke, a Democrat, was encouraged by the “huge energy” animating the women’s movement and said it showed that “women in Tennessee are really pushing for a new direction.”

Later Saturday, thousands of people turned out for the women’s march in Nashville, and more than 1,000 participated in a similar event in Memphis.

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