WINDOW ROCK, Ariz. — Navajo Nation officials have signed a proclamation commemorating the Treaty of 1868, which marked the end of the Navajo people’s exile at an internment in southeast New Mexico and their return to the Four Corners region.

The tribes’ officials said Friday that 2018 will by the “Year of the Treaty” to mark the 150th anniversary of the signing of the document.

They say it both ended the displacement of thousands of Navajo men, women and children at Bosque Redondo, and established Navajo’s intergovernmental relationship with the United States.

In June, the Navajo Nation Museum in Window Rock, Arizona, plans to display the original Navajo Treaty of 1868.

There also are plans for it to be on display at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of the American Indian in Washington.

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